Zero Mile + The Bowery Present:

SUSTO

With Great Peacock

Friday, December 22
8:00PM doors / 9:00PM show
18 and Over
  • Price$15.00 - $17.00
TICKETS

SUSTO

SUSTO is the brainchild of Justin Osborne. It was born out of collaboration between Osborne & various colleagues including but not limited to Johnny Delaware, Wolfgang Zimmerman, Nicholas Scott Woodley & Camilo Miranda. These collaborations took place between 2011 & 2013 in Charleston & Havana. Early writing & recording for SUSTO began in late 2011. In early 2013 Osborne began performing solo in South Carolina & Cuba under the name of SUSTO. By August of that year SUSTO was performing as a full band. In addition to Osborne covering rhythm guitar, keyboards, & lead vocals _ this line-up included Taylor McCleskey on drums, Eric Mixon on bass and Johnny Delaware on lead guitar & background vocals. By early 2014 the debut self titled album was finalized & subsequently released by Osborne & Delaware's label Peninsula Records on April Fool's Day (04/01/2014). After an extensive North American solo tour (Summer 2014) in support of SUSTO's debut album, Osborne returned to Charleston and began to solidify a permanent live band. SUSTO's full band line-up eventually came to be Corey Campbell (Guitar, Keys, Vocals), Johnny Delaware (Guitar, Keys, Vocals), Jordan Hicks (Bass Guitar), Marshall Hudson (Drums/Percussion) and Justin Osborne (Vocals, Guitar, Keys). The band maintains a moderate tour schedule & a second album with the werking title "& I'm Fine Today" is now in production; no timeframe has been established regarding it's release.

Great Peacock

You can call Great Peacock a folk band... but don't expect them to make music for campfires or square dances. Raised in the Deep South and headquartered in Nashville, they're a group of red-blooded country boys who aren't afraid of the big city. Case in point: Making Ghosts -- the duo's harmony-heavy, guitar-driven debut album -- whose 11 songs find the middle ground between rootsy, down-home Americana and super-sized arena pop/rock. "To us, it's just pop music with organic acoustic instruments," says Andrew Nelson, who shares lead vocals and guitar duties with co-founder Blount Floyd. "The album has some fiddle, some pedal steel and a whole lot of acoustic guitar, which sounds like the traditional setup for a country band. But this isn't a country record. It's not really a folk record, either. It's a pop/record... with folk tendencies." Nelson and Floyd first crossed paths in their early 20s, bonding instantly over a shared love of cheap beer and good Southern music. After logging several years together in a loud, Tennessee-based rock band, they split off to form their own project, swapping out the amplified swagger of their previous group for a straightforward sound anchored by acoustic guitars, anthemic melodies and two intertwined voices. Like an old-school harmony duo retuned for a new generation, they started off with a handful of classic influences -- the country croon of George Jones, the working class rock & roll of Bruce Springsteen, the heartland hum of Tom Petty -- and expanded their sound from there, turning Great Peacock into the sort of band that's simultaneously rooted in tradition and headed toward new territory. The music on Making Ghosts reflects Great Peacock's ambition. Songs like "Tennessee" are swooning, sweeping tributes to the band's homeland, while "Take Me To The Mountain" pushes the band toward anthemic territory, fueled by super-sized drums and a radio-ready melody. On "Arms," the guys jump between haunting verses and big, Technicolor choruses, capping everything off with a screeching guitar solo. These peacocks know how to strut their stuff. What's in a name, by the way? In Great Peacock's case, quite a bit. "We initially thought it was just a funny name for a band," Nelson admits, "but through the evolution of everything we've done, we've always been big and colorful. That's why Blount jumps around onstage. That's why I wear a suit jacket embroidered with feathers, which is basically a poor man's nudie suit. We've embraced the image of the big peacock feathers, and we want to entertain you. We look that way, we think that way, and we sound that way, too."