Terminal West Presents:

Patrick Watson

With Trevor Sensor

Wednesday, March 29
7:30PM doors / 8:30PM show

Set Times:

7:30pm Doors + Stationside Open
8:30pm Trevor Sensor
9:30pm Patrick Watson

18 and Over
  • Price$17.00 - $20.00
TICKETS

Patrick Watson

Now approaching a decade as a band, it has been a truly interesting journey for Patrick Watson and his cohorts. Having accomplished such feats as playing to over 100,000 people at the 2009 Montreal Jazz Festival, composing 15 scores for film and television, receiving Canada's elite Polaris Music Prize in 2007, and most recently performing two songs in Wim Wenders's current 3D epic "Every Thing Will Be Fine", his career has had many peaks, with more to come with the release of his forthcoming album, Love Songs For Robots.Still standing proudly at the helm, Love Songs For Robots marks Patrick Watson's fifth release since Watson first galvanized this "temporary project" in 2006 with the release of his critically acclaimed debut Close To Paradise. His latest installment in his already impressive body of work follows up on his stunning 2012 release Adventures In Your Own Backyard. Signatures like his hushed falsetto croon remains to be the vessel that transports his vast emotional depths, but Love Songs For Robots proudly shows Watson sailing out into uncharted waters once again.The new album was recorded at Capitol Studios in Los Angeles and Pierre Marchand Studio in Montreal. Of the record, some of which was debuted at private concerts in small loft spaces, Watson explains, "I started thinking about things in a very mechanical way. I found it interesting how we would use our senses to come up with an emotional reaction. As I get older you get to know yourself better and I realized that a lot of my emotional reactions were mechanical responses and that was hugely influential. I didn't want to be a robot. But the reason why we are superior to computers is that we have emotions and I realized that emotions are mechanical so the only thing left between us and robots is curiosity and inspiration – and I don't think you can program that into a computer. That's definitely where I was at when I started writing the record."From the crawling crescendo of the opening ethereal soundscape of the title track, the listener is slowly lured into Watson's world, revealing musical moments that are as equally challenging as they are comforting. Destinations are cleverly concealed as we are invited to take in the lush scenery – sharp experimental and progressive left turns, grandiose gestures that shoulder up against fearless austerity – and all delivered in a crisp panoramic scope that could only come from Watson's lens. His hard-fought lyrical pearls are now guided through newfound psychedelic and soul swagger influences, as left of center instrumentation and arrangements cover up well-beaten tracks, and makes this a rewarding and truly original statement.Love Songs for Robots bears Watson's indelible stamp, and manages to create a piece of work that is not only stirring, daring, and deeply personal, but also represents his creative watermark so far. It's all too rare to see an artist wear their heart on their sleeve while never growing weary of the battle against cynicism and callousness, but Watson and band's aim remains true.

Trevor Sensor

Trevor Sensor was born in Sterling, Illinois, an old industrial town whose strong foothold in the steel and manufacturing industry once saw it nicknamed 'The Hardware Capital of the World' (though since the mill's closure, Sensor likens it to the Lynchian neighbourhood of Lumberton from 'Blue Velvet'). As a teenager, part-time work in the local golf course was countered with experiments in various alternative rock bands: Trevor would idolise idiosyncratic front-men and vocalists like Billy Corgan or Gordan Gano of The Violent Femmes, as well as the canon of great American authors (Salinger, Miller) he'd go on to study at college in Pella, Iowa.The two began to fuse in his early songwriting, which was recorded between stints as a dish-washer in the local bar and grill ("you learn a lot from the ex-junkies who make up the kitchen staff," he says now). Among the early results are startling debut single 'The Reaper Man', an ambiguous encounter with death driven by Sensor's raw but soulful voice ("Oh here's the reaper man, he's looking after me / Oh here's the reaper man, he's coming to take me"). Coloured by local love affairs, 50s TV and the mysticism of the Midwest, flip-side 'Villains and Preachers' is a similarly outsider's vision of small-town suburbia, from which Trevor Sensor has emerged one of the most striking new finds of the year.